How to Study for SAT: Practical Examples

The SAT is an international college admission test showing admission committees your level of knowledge and practical skills. No matter whether you are taking it in reading, writing or math, it is the right way for you to show colleges your skills. Your SAT results and high school grades is a preferable combo when applying to college admissions. How to study for SAT? We offer you a list of useful points and rules you need to know for your SAT test practice. Pay attention to them.

how-to-study-for-sat

  • Two dashes – verb agreement

Wrong: The boys – including Mark and Peter – is ready to go swimming.
Correct: The boys – including Mark and Peter – are ready to go swimming.

  • Lengthy phrase between subject and verb

W: The man who was seen in the woods were recognized.
C: The man who was seen in the woods was recognized.

  • The amount of, the number of, etc.

W: The amount of festival visitors were huge.
C: The amount of festival visitors was huge.

  • Subject verb agreement with preposition “of”

W: The consequences of the football match was unpredictable.
C: The consequences of the football match were unpredictable.

  • “Each” of “every”

W: Every boy and girl are encouraged to take part in school competitions.
C: Every boy and girl is encouraged to take part in school competitions.

  • Collective nouns

W: The admission committee of teachers are meeting today.
C: The admission committee of teachers is meeting today.

  • Incorrect verb tense (had+main verb)

W: She had phoned her husband by the time neighbours had seen the fire.
C: She had phoned her husband by the time neighbours saw the fire.

  • Verbs ending in “-ing”

W: The woman on the next street having a retirement party.
C: The woman on the next street is having a retirement party.

  • Faulty pronoun antecedent agreement – “one”

W: In our courses, one can get a certificate and free practical lessons.
C: In our courses, you can get a certificate and free practical lessons.

  • Pronouns he/him, she/her, we/us, etc.

W: I think us girls should be allowed to take part in wrestling competitions.
C: I think we girls should be allowed to take part in wrestling competitions.

  • Possessive nouns

W: Since getting acquainted with Lisa’s sister, I have liked her more.
C: Since getting acquainted with her sister, I have liked Lisa more.

  • Incomplete comparison

W: My essay has a longer preview than Megan’s.
C: My essay has a longer preview than Megan’s essay.

  • Introductory modifying clause

W: Preparing for classes, my uniform was ironed.
C: Preparing for classes, I ironed my uniform.

  • Conjunctions “either” or “neither”

W: He is neither talented or skillful.
C: He is neither talented nor skillful.

  • Pronouns “either”, “neither” antecedent agreement

W: Neither of the girls started to write essays for their application.
C: Neither of the girls started to write essays for her application.

  • Wrong pairs of correlating conjunctions – “both…and”, “not only…but also”, “whether…or”

W: He is not only smart but practical.
C: He is not only smart but also practical.

Now you understand what to pay attention to and how to study for SAT. Do your best to persuade yourself in your future success in the SAT writing section and write an impressive work. If you need more SAT test practice, avoid these common errors and carefully proofread your writing.

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